Catch These French Films at Filmfest DC

FilmFest DC 2016

In the winter months, I try to cram in as many oscar-nominated films as I can before the awards are given out. After that movie-binge, I typically take a needed break from the cinemas. Until April and Filmfest DC

Filmfest is the District’s first, largest and only international film festival. Between April 14 and 24, 2016 Filmfest DC will celebrate 30 years of delighting Washington cinephiles with a really impressive line-up of 75 movies from 45 different countries. As always, that includes a number of films from France and Belgium. Here are some of the French(-ish) or French-language films you can look forward to this year. 

THE BRAND NEW TESTAMENTLe tout nouveau testament

The poster claims that “G-d exist… and he lives in Brussels.” Colour me intrigued, especially since the film is directed by Jaco Van Dormael who has made such great films as Toto the Hero or The Eight Day. In the story, G-d (Benoit Poelvoorde — catch him in Romantics Anonymous available on DVD on Netflix!) is alive and grumpy in the Belgian capital, where he controls the universe from his computer and torments his family, including his wife the amazing Yolande Moreau and 10 year old daughter, Ea. To get back at her dad, Ea sends everyone their death dates via SMS… and that’s just the beginning. Intrigued? You should be! The film was Belgium’s entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards, making the December shortlist of nine films, but falling just short of being nominated (it was nominated but didn’t win at France’s Cesars.) Watch the trailer here and catch The New Testament at AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 21 at 6:30PM or April 22 at 6:30PM. (In French with English subtitles.)

BELGIAN RHAPSODY 

Belgian rhapsody

Belgian Rhapsody illustrates the competition between the small country’s two linguistic groups – the French-speaking Walloons and the Flemish –  through the fierce battle of two brass bands vying for a European championship. The exuberant Wallo-Flemish musical comedy will be shown at Landmark’s E Street Cinema on April 18 at 8:45PM and April 23 at 5PM. (In Dutch and French with English subtitles.)

THE MEASURE OF A MANla loi du marche

I just saw posters for this film in new York City, which makes me think it has the best chance out of all the movies on this list to actually make it to theater in Washington, DC. Vincent Lindon is always superb and won awards for his performance both at Cannes and at the Cesars. This terrific drama echoes the Dardenne brothers’ “Two Days, One Night” in its exploration of what people are willing to do to keep their jobs. Here, Lindon portrays a fifty-something former factory worker, who after being unemployed for 20 months, finally accepts a soul-destroying job as a security guard for a megastore.  The movie is co-presented by the French Embassy where it will show on April 22 at 7PM. It will also show at AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 16 at 5PM. (In French with English subtitles.) The French Embassy will be screening another film, Anne Fontaine’s The Innocents, immediately following The measure of a man, at 9PM on April 22 if you feel like a French double feature. Details here

MY KING

Speaking of acting awards at Cannes, its director Emmanuelle Bercot, who also plays the tittle character in this movie (called Maiwenn in French), won that last year. Her film focuses on Maiween who tears up her knee cap skiing in the opening sequence. As her therapist hints that the whole thing was more of a cry for help than an accident she looks back at her life with her man-child partner Giorgio (swoon worthy Vincent Cassel) and remembers the highs and lows of their life together. My King is showing at AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 15 at 6:30PM and at Landmark’s E Street Cinema on April 17 at 5:30PM. (In French with English subtitles.)

My King

 

THE WHITE KNIGHTS

But back to Vincent Lindon. He leads the Move For Kids organization in this provocative Franco-Belgian drama that looks at the darker side of humanitarian assistance. Directly inspired by real events (the highly suspect story of French NGO Zoe’s Ark whose members were arrested in 2007 for illegally trafficking children they claimed to be orphans from war-torn Darfur) The White Knight raises many questions and offers no easy answers about what is wrong and what is right… what my husband would dub an excellent but infuriatingly French film 😉 Catch The White Knight at AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 15 at 9PM or at Landmark’s E Street Cinema on April 22 at 6:30PM. (In French with English Subtitles.)

The White Knights

 

LOVE & FRIENDSHIPLove and Friendship

What is this very British love satire based on Jane Austen’s never-previously-filmed novella in letters Lady Susan doing in a list of French film you ask? Well, it’s co-produced by France, the Netherlands and Ireland. So there, French enough-ish! Plus it looks really good (I always love a good period film!) Brit Kate Beckinsale plays a widow who seeks refuge with her in-laws. As rumours about her private life begin to circulate, she sets out to find a husband for a herself, and a father for her daughter, the reluctant debutante Frederica. There’s only one showing at Landmark’s E Street Cinema on April 19 at 6:30PM so don’t miss it. (In English… no subtitles.)

3000 NIGHTS

Saying that I loved Room doesn’t feel quite right because the topic the film/book dealt with is so dark. 3000 Nights feels almost like Room and is also partially based on true stories, that of Palestinian women in Israeli prisons. In the film, Layla is unaccountably thrown into a police van and convicted. She ends up pregnant and in jail and is allowed to keep the child who grows up in a grim cell, knowing nothing of the outside world, but surrounded by love from his mother and her five Palestinian cell mates. Palestinian director Mai Masri is initially a documentary filmmaker and 3000 Nights concludes with a powerful documentary.

3000 Nights

A Palestine/France/Qatar/Jordan/UAE coproduction, the film is co-presented by the Embassy of Qatar and showing at Landmark’s E Street Cinema on April 21 at 8:30PM and AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 23 at 9:30PM. That last screening will be attended by the director too. (In Arabic and Hebrew with English subtitles.)

MY INTERNSHIP IN CANADA

The festival saved the best for last with its closing film! Academy award nominated director Philippe Falardeau, of Monsieur Balthazar and The Good Lie fame, returns with a political satire featuring Starbuck’s Patrick Huard (one of my absolute favourite in-French film currently streaming on Netflix… watch it!!) as a former pro-hockey player whose career never took off because he was afraid to get on planes. Now an independent MP and the last honest man in office, his vote can decide the fate of legislation that could send the country to war. The PM relies heavily on guidance from his Haitian intern Souverain, who seems to know more about the ins and outs of Canadian politics than he does.

My Internship in Canada

While reviews agree that My Internship in Canada (watch the trailer here) doesn’t quite live up to its potential, you won’t want to miss this screening at AMC Mazza Gallerie on April 24th, the closing night of the festival, because it will be attended by director Philippe Falardeau and followed by a reception sponsored by the Office of Quebec. (In French, Creole, with some English dialogue and English subtitles.)

Are you looking forward to Filmfest DC this year? The list above is by no means exhaustive, just some French-ish movies that I would like to see during the festival. You can see a full list of all the films shown through April 24th right here. Let me know if you see anything good!  

I’m in a Marseille State of Mind

I’ve had Marseille on my mind lately. Part of it has been following along my friend Tammy’s adventures in house swapping and remote working from Marseille (you can read all about it on her blog Florida Girl in DC.) It’s definitely made me look at my mom’s hometown completely differently! And the other part, of course, is that Marseille seems to be everywhere lately. First, there was the recent release of the movie Marseille in France. And now, there’s the countdown to the much anticipated (at least by me) release of Netflix’s first French-language original series Marseille. The trailer looks SO GOOD!! 

The show’s 8 episodes (52 minutes each) will drop worldwide on May 5 (binge party anyone?) and focus on a political succession story between Gerard Depardieu’s character, the mayor of Marseille and his heir and eventual challenger. It’s been marketed as a tale of power, corruption and redemption and already dubbed a French House of Cards, though the trailer made me think more of the series Boss than anything else. I’m under NO illusions that it will be anything as successful as House of Cards I’m still super excited to watch it, especially because my husband is kinda looking forward to it too, and any time I can get him to watch anything in french, let alone be excited about it is definitely a victory in my books!! Plus, I can’t wait to see how Marseille fares as a backdrop! 

ps: curious about Marseille? Check out my trip recap post right here. 

Watch La Famille Belier at l’Alliance Francaise

Grab some tissues and head to l’Alliance Francaise on April 1 to catch a screening of La Famille Belier. The feel good film was quite a hit in France in 2014, but it didn’t really come out in the United States 😦 I got to watch during my Air France flight back to Washington, DC last August and while the film is technically a comedy I found myself practically bawling in my crammed middle seat during the final scenes. Here’s the trailer with English subtitles:

La Famille Belier is a coming of age tale about Paula, a musically gifted teenager who has to come to terms with allowing her voice to be heard. The reason it’s so difficult for her is that both her parents and brother are deaf. Finding her voice and letting go is particularly difficult for Paula who knows her parents are dependent on her to speak and hear on their behalf in their every day life. But it’s also difficult for her parents and I challenge you to keep your eyes dry by the time Paula, played delicately by Louane Emera, sings about flying away. That’s when you’ll need your tissues…. And speaking of Louane and tissues, I also challenge you not to be moved by her sweet blind audition from season 2 of The Voice (yep, France has it own version of singing competition too!) 

You can catch La Famille Belier, in French with English subtitles at l’Alliance Francaise on April 1.

For Your Consideration – the Brooklyn Cocktail

It’s Oscar time! Have you seen Brooklyn? The coming-of-age period drama about a young Irish immigrant blossoming in 1950s New York City was one of my favourite films last year. As an expat, I loved and related to the delicate way the film covered the immigrant experience and in a sea of rather bleak movies I appreciated the optimism of its characters. Also, Montreal plays the title role of Brooklyn!  The boarding house where Saoirse Ronan’s character, Eilis, lives in Brooklyn is actually the Memorial Chapter House of Montreal’s Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, on McGill University’s campus!

The Brooklyn Cocktail

The perfect drink to celebrate this best picture nominees is the classic cocktail that shares its name: the Brooklyn. It’s not as well-known as its classic neighbour, the Manhattan*, but it’s just as good. Here what you’ll need for one cocktail:

2 ounces whiskey (Jameson or Teeling would be a perfect nod to Ireland here)
1 ounce dry vermouth
1/4 ounce maraschino liqueur (I always love Leopold Brothers small batch liqueurs)
Dash of angostura bitters

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker over ice. Shake and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry. I used Luxardo cherries, and the brand also makes a great maraschino liqueur. In keeping with the slight cherry theme, I’ll be serving Brooklyns along with a twist on Pepperidge’s Dried Cherries Pecan and Rosemary Brie en Croute, a not-so-subtle homage to best actress nominee Brie Larson. 

Sláinte and good luck to Brooklyn tonight! Will you be watching the Oscars? What film(s) will be cheering for?

* While the Manhattan is the most famous, there are actually 5 five classic cocktails named after New York’s borough: the Brooklyn mentioned in this post, the Queens (a variant of the martini with pineapple juice), the Bronx (another variant of the martini but with orange juice) and the Staten Island Ferry (malibu rum and pineapple juice). Now you know 😉

Save the Date: Screening of Full Moon in Paris at the National Gallery of Arts

I’ve got an idea for you: travel to Paris without leaving DC. Actually, without leaving the National Gallery of Art

On September 20th, the National Gallery of Art is hosting a 4PM screening of Les Nuits de la Pleine Lune/Full Moon in Parisa masterful comedy of manners by new wave film maker Eric Rohmer that was recently restored. You can read a summary of the film here

Full Moon In Paris
Also on view at the National Gallery of Art right now (and through October 4th) are 50 of the most important and beloved paintings of Paris and its environs by impressionist Gustave Caillebotte. Never heard of Caillebotte? You’re not alone 😉 “Known” as the “unknown Impressionist” in light of Cézanne, Degas, Monet or Auguste-Renoir’s success, Caillebotte played a vital role in the early history of Impressionism by being a patron of the impressionists, whose work he supported and purchased (he came from a wealthy family and didn’t need to sell his work to get by.) His most famous work, “Paris Street, Rainy Day” is one of the highlights of the exhibit, which will move on to the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas once it wraps up here. 

Gustave Caillebotte Jour de pluie à Paris
For a perfect “French in DC” afternoon, I would start with a casual brunch at Paul’s flagship store at the Navy Memorial then walk over to the National Gallery of Art on Sixth and Constitution Avenue to soak in Haussmannian area Paris at the Caillebotte exhibit before wrapping the day with the screening of the very French comedy of manner. If you *really* didn’t want to leave the National Gallery of Art you could also start with brunch at the museum’s Garden Cafe too 😉

Francophonie Festival, 2015 Edition

The largest celebration of French culture and language in the world—the Francophonie Cultural Festival—is returning to the US capital March 5 to April 1, 2015. Organized by the D.C. Francophonie Committee in association with l’Alliance Française and Smithsonian Associates, the festival engages over 40 embassies for a month of cultural events ranging from lectures to concerts and movie screenings, culminating as usual with la Grande Fête de la Francophonie, a huge foodie bash at la Maison Française at the French Embassy.

What I’ve loved about the partnership with Smithsonian Associates this year is how active Smithsonian at 8 (the 21+  after-hours event planning art of the Smithsonian) has been about shinning a light on all the different countries that belong to the francophone world. Check out their facebook page, for example. Over the past few years, they’ve posted a recipe for Belgian waffles and the essentials of Senegalese cuisine, highlighted 10 of the most confusing words in the French language, gave us a crash course of playing the African drums and got me dreaming of jetting off to Guinea!

unnamed-5

unnamed-2

Of course, Smithsonian at 8 has also been promoting the Grande Fête which will cap off the festival on March 27, 2015, and doing a Caption That contest to help you win free tickets. I’ve been to the Grande Fête many times, and here are a few tips to enjoy the party at the French Embassy:

  • la grande fete de la francophonieBuy your tickets early. The event will sell out, it always does.
  • Get to the party early. Even though the Grande Fête takes place on the expansive grounds of La Maison Francaise at the French Embassy, it gets very crowded, very fast. If you’re attending with a large group of people, agree on a meeting point because you’ll probably loose each other.
  • Don’t bring a big bag! They’ll be checking IDs and bags at the entrance so you’ll go through faster if you don’t have too much on you.
  • Uber to and back from the Embassy. There’s no parking available at the Embassy and not many spots in the streets nearby. The D6 bus does stop and pick up really close if you want to take public transportation.
  • Be prepared for long lines as you sample food and drink from more than 30 embassies as diverse as Ukraine, Cape Verde, Haiti, Tunisia and Belgium.
  • Stay for the concert! DJ Princess Slaya will spin music from Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and plenty of destinations in between. The concert is when you stop spending all your time in a line and when the party really gets moving!
  • Bring cash. You’ll get food/drink samples from 7-9PM but it’s cash bar afterwards.

This year’s schedule seems a little more limited than in previous years, but besides the Grande Fête, there are a few interesting events like the Swiss Art Night at Hillyer Art Space, March 26 (6:30-9:00PM – free), Laissez les Bons Temps Rouler, a celebration of Louisiana at l’Alliance Française, March 20 (7PM – $20-$30) or Annecy in DC: a Selection of French Animated Shorts at the French Embassy, March 11 (7PM – free but reservations required.)

Make sure to visit FrancophonieDC.org for more info, including ticket costs, the description of the events and films, and times and locations.

Best French Films Streaming on Netflix Right Now

When I first wrote this post, I had a hard time narrowing down the list to 20 films. There were SO many great French films available either to stream or through good old fashioned DVDs. Well, that landscape has changed drastically in a few years 😉 But if you are looking for a quick escape to France without leaving the comfort of your couch, here is a (short) list of some French films I’ve been pleasantly surprised to find streaming on Netflix

 

Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain ~ What can I say about this delightful whimsical film that hasn’t been said before? The French don’t do feel good films very well so Amelie definitely stands out with its romanticized version of Paris, quirky characters and happy ending. Previously, its director Jean-Pierre Jeunet had impressed critics worldwide with another film, the surreal and morbid comedy  Delicatessen, which you can also stream on Netflix right now.Le fabuleux destin d'amelie poulain

Bande de Filles ~ I had a hard time watching this movie which is probably the polar opposite of Amelie for its grim realism. Girlhood is the coming of age story of Marieme, a young black adolescent, who is struggling in school, dealing with an abusive brother and helps take care of her younger sisters while her mother cleans offices for a living. She befriends a group of 3 girls  and eventually evolves from a shy adolescent to a confident young woman, though she starts to push the limits of what she can do a little bit too far… It’s a grim film, but it’s fascinating.  

Blue is the Warmest Color/La vie d’Adèle ~ There was a lot of drama surrounding this film. In awarding it the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, Steven Spielberg and his jury also added the two main actresses to the director in the distinction. That’s not typical, and speaks to the amazing performances of Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos, as well as to the controversial methods of director Abdellatif Kechiche. Blue is another coming of age tale but this time its high school age protagonist falls in love in a slightly older woman, an artist with blue hair. Over the course of 179 minutes (the film is quite long!) she discovers desire, finds herself then loses herself and ultimately grows into adulthood. Warning: the film is long and the sex scenes are drawn out at times, and very graphic. This isn’t an early date movie or something you watch with your parents or children.

Blue is the warmest color

 

 

Bienvenue a Marly-Gomont ~ “The African Doctor” is a quirky movie with a good sense of humor, a positive message and a lot of heart. It’s based on the real life experience of rapper Kamini, whose father Seyolo Zantoko, the only African graduate from his French medical school, turns down a position back in his home country to become the local physician in a small, rural French village.  He is optimistically determined to give his children opportunities they wouldn’t have back where he grew up and blind to the struggles his family face in trying to integrate into the tight-knit, all white community. 

 

Gad Gone Wild ~ Unfortunately, none of Gad Elmaleh’s films (like Le Valet) are available on Netflix anymore… but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy watching the funnyman on Netflix. While not technically a film, you can catch Gad in Gad Gone Wild , a special comedy routine that was recorded in Montreal.
Chef’s Table, France ~ Not technically a film either, but an awesome collection of 4 food-focused documentaries that make a statement on the current state of French cooking by profiling chefs Alain Passard (Arpege), Michel Troisgros (Maison Troisgros), Adeline Grattard (Yam’Tcha) and Alexandre Couillon (La Marine). 
 

Les Bleus ~ Hailed as one of the best sports documentary on Netflix, Les Bleus looks at French politics and society through the prism of the national football team. In particular, the documentary charts 20 turbulent years of the French national side, from the “bleu-blanc-beurre” team that united a country after winning the 1998 world cup to flopping completely in the subsequent World Cup and its more recent resurgence of under Laurent Blanc and Didier Deschamps. More than a documentary on football, it’s really about French society, hitting on issues of class, race and nationality. So add it to your queue!

 

There you have it! A pretty short list of French films that you should watch on Netflix. Where id all the movies go? Le sad. 

{This post is based on an original list first published on 12/27/2011 and was most recently updated on October 30 2017.}

A Year In Champagne at the Angelika Film Center

Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market With its reserved seating, gourmet concessions and interesting mix of blockbuster and special interest films, the Angelika Film Center & Cafe at the Mosaic District is one of my absolute favourite movie theater in the Washington area. Keyword: Washington area. It’s nowhere near the city and pretty inconvenient to get to if you don’t have a car. So I was thrilled when a smaller, albeit temporary version, of the art-house movie theater popped up behind Union Market. It became pretty handy when I was trying to catch up on my Oscar nominated films, showing Whiplash, Still Alice and a couple of other nominated flicks. Eventually, the pop-up Angelika Film theater at Union Market will transform into a full scale permanent location but until then, its three screens currently offers around 4-6 different indie and art-house films at various times throughout the day. You can reserve your seat in advance, meaning you can hang out in the lounge area or at Union Market until right about the time your film starts. The only downside is that the theater has NO incline, meaning you’re kinda screwed if someone tall sits in front of you…But on the plus side, there’s free drip coffee during matinee shows and you can purchase wine and beer to bring inside the movie.

Speaking of wine and beer… both Angelika theaters in the D.C. area are showing a great documentary on champagne on Wednesday March 4 2015. The film, A Year in Champagne, is part of a wine trilogy led by renowned wine importer Martine Saunier. If you haven’t seen it yet, you can catch the first chapter, A Year in Burgundy,  on Netflix where it’s streaming. The third chapter, a Year in Porto, will be released later. About the film: A Year in Champagne gives viewers a rare glimpse behind the scenes into the real Champagne by spending time with six houses, from a small independent maker like Champagne Saint-Chamant, where each and every bottle is still turned by hand in the cellars to the illustrious houses of Gosset and Bollinger, which have been instrumental in shaping the image of Champagne around the world.

Both Angelika theaters are throwing a champagne tasting party to go along the film screening on March 4, 2015!
At the Angelika Film Center & Cafe in Fairfax, happy hour will start at 6PM in the lounge with wine, beer and snacks available for purchase. Experts from nearby wine shop Swirl & Sip will also be on hand to talk about Champagne before the movie screening at 7pm (movie tickets available here.) In Washington, the screening will also take place on the 4th and start with a tasting at Cordial Fine Wines & Spirits from 4:30-6:30PM (advance movie tickets available here.)

Cheers!

French Offerings at the 25th Washington Jewish Film Festival

images

Joyeux anniversaire to the Washington Jewish Film Festival (WJFF)! This year, the WJFF celebrates its 25th year with 11 days of film programming, and cultural events exploring the diversity of the Jewish experience across the globe. Between February 19 and March 1, 2015, D.C. audiences will be treated to some 100 movie screenings and related events across the DMV, including many premieres and an exciting roster of filmmaker and cast appearances. To honour the festival’s past, former festival directors have also selected a special line up of retrospective film screenings that includes the heartbreaking classic Louis Malle film Au Revoir les Enfants (on Feb 21 at the Goethe Institut and Feb 24 at the Washington DC Jewish Community Center.) Here are some of the French or French-language films that will be shown at this year’s festival:

Yidlife Crisis (episode 1 & 2 on February 21, 8:30PM and episode 3 & 4 on March 1 at 4:30PM, both screenings at the Goethe Institut)  ~ this series is actually in yiddish, but I wanted to include it in the list because it’s set in Montreal’s Mile End neighbourhood and is directed by/stars a McGill University graduate, like myself. Check out the first episode below. It’s about Yom Kippur and is set at la Banquise. Chaimie orders his poutine with sauce on the side to try and make it more kosher friendly…. and it’s hilarious!

 

1620570_548033148647494_8688359386499905645_n

Belle et Sebastien (February 28, 12:30PM at DCJCC and March 1 at 11AM at the DCJCC) ~ I actually really want to see this heartwarming feature film adaptation of a sweet TV cartoon I used to watch as a kid. Belle et Sebastien tells the beautiful story of the friendship between a boy and dog, with the German occupation and the French Alps as backdrop. Actually, I don’t remember there being Nazis in the TV series… so I guess they changed a few things here and there… but there’s still a beautiful friendship between a boy and his dog and it’s you have kids, it’s probably one of the most family-friendly offering at the festival.

Qu'est-ce_qu'on_a_fait_au_bon_dieu-_posterQu’est qu’on a fait au bon Dieu/Serial (Bad) Weddings (February 21, 8:45PM at the DCJCC and February 24, 8:30PM at the Avalon) ~ this movie was a commercial hit in France and it looks really funny. I’m not sure it’s entirely PC since it plays off, and then upends, racial stereotypes of all stripes. It’s about parents who just want their youngest daughter to marry a catholic boy after the first three married successively a Jewish man, an Arab man and an Asian man.

images**Just added** A special screening of Felix et Meira (February 25, 8:45Pm at the DCJCC) ~ a Canadian drama also set in Montreal’s Mile End neighbourhood. It’s a forbidden love story that has explores love across cultural divides as a married Hasidic Jewish woman and a penniless, atheist francophone trying to find a meaningful connection despite all of their differences.

The Last Metro (February 24, 12:15PM at DCJCC and February 25, 7PM at the Goethe Institut) and Au Revoir les Enfants (February 21, 6:30PM at the Goethe Institut and February 24, 3PM at the DCJCC) ~ classic French films that are worth seeing over and over and are part of the special line up of retrospective films. You can actually stream Au Revoir on hulu as well.

images-2images-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the films, there’s also some events happening in parallel to the film festival, like a special dinner at DGS delicatessen on February 21, following the screening of Deli Man.

Are you looking forward to seeing any films at the 25th Washington Jewish Film Festival? You can look up a full line up of all the movies showing right here.

Chinese Food & a (French) Movie On Erev Christmas

It happened in St. TropezAre Chinese diner and a movie part of your Christmas traditions? If the answer is yes (or oui) and you want to add a little something French to your Erev Christmas, look no further than the Washington DC Jewish Community Center on 16th street. They will be screening It Happened in Saint-Tropez, a French comedy of manners featuring the stunning (and now age appropriate Bond girl) Monica Bellucci. The screening will be preceded by some traditional Chinese food starting at 6:30PM.

Speaking of “traditional Jewish Christmas food,” the night before (12/23) you can also swing by DGS Delicatessen, which will be hosting its second  “Jewish Christmas” Chinese  banquet, with guest chefs Erik Bruner Yang of Toki Underground and Tim Ma of Water & Wall. The menu (hello Kung Pao pastrami!) looks SO fun!