Los Angeles en 10 Photos

J’ai rarement l’occasion de visiter la côte ouest. La Californie, mine de rien, c’est quand même à six heures d’avion de Washington (DC! mais c’est quand même quatre heure de vol de l’état de Washington aussi) donc c’est pas comme si on peut y aller juste pour un petit weekend…  Mais comme j’étais à Anaheim pas loin pour une conference au travail, j’en ai profité pour rentabiliser le billet (surtout qu’il était payé par ma boite!) et je suis restée quelques jours de plus sur Los Angeles, histoire de redécouvrir un peu la deuxième plus grande ville des Etats Unis. 

Voici un petit aperçu de mon séjour à Los Angeles en 10 photos. Pas mal on été prises à Venice Beach comme c’est là que j’avais loué un AirBnB (que je recommande fort d’ailleurs pour ceux qui passeraient à Los Angeles!) Sinon, comme ce n’était quand même pas mon premier voyage là bas, j’ai évité les gros lieux touristiques et j’ai préféré explorer un peu des nouveaux quartiers comme Echo Park et Silver Lake ainsi que revoir le Hollywood sign, mais d’un angle un peu different cette fois 😉 Je vous laisse voir:

Palm Trees in Los Angeles

Le gros cliché de Los Angeles: les palmiers partout, à perte de vue, sur la plage, dans la ville. Ils font rêver et on ne s’en lasse pas!

 

Les surfeurs adorent et moi aussi! Un bol de sashimi hawaïen de Poke-Poke, dégusté sur la plage de Venice Beach pour un diner healthy et léger, et pas cher en plus.

Toujours à Venice, la célèbre Muscle beach, la plage du bodybuilding avec ses salles de musculations en plein air.

Toujours à Venice, la célèbre Muscle beach, la plage du bodybuilding avec ses salles de musculations en plein air.

Il n'y a pas que la plage à Venice Beach, y'a aussi le quartier historique des Canaux de Venice qui était tout près de mon AirBnB.

Il n’y a pas que la plage à Venice Beach, y’a aussi le quartier historique des Canaux de Venice qui était tout près de mon AirBnB.

Hiking to the Hollywood sign in Los Angeles

C’est LE symbole de Los Angeles et la meilleure façon de le voir de près, c’est a la fin d’une randonnée dans les collines d’Hollywood.

Trouvaille colorée au détour des rues du quartier branché de Silver Lake, à l’Est de Downtown

On reste dans le sport avec cet escalier, une trouvaille colorée au détour des rues du quartier branché de Silver Lake, à l’Est de Downtown. 

 

Decouverte pour moi lors de ce voyage: la quartier de Echo Park avec ces collines couvertes de petites maisons colorées et son superbe park, avec une vue imprenable sur downtown.

Découverte pour moi lors de ce voyage: la quartier de Echo Park avec ces collines remplies de petites maisons colorées et son superbe park, avec une vue imprenable sur downtown.

Autre découverte, celle du nouveau musée d'art contemporain du Broad. Il a ouvert ces portes fin 2015 et rengorge d'œuvres de Koons, Hirst, Basquiat, Mapplethorpe et Braque. Bonus: il est gratuit!

Autre découverte, celle du nouveau musée d’art contemporain du Broad. Il a ouvert ces portes fin 2015 et rengorge d’œuvres de Koons, Hirst, Basquiat, Mapplethorpe et Braque. Bonus: il est gratuit!

Un de mes buts pendant mon sejour a Los Angeles: ne jamais depenser plus de $20 par repas. Mission accomplie avec ces ramens a Tsujita LA Artisan Noodle.

Un de mes buts pendant mon séjour à Los Angeles: ne jamais dépenser plus de $20 par repas. Mission accomplie avec ces ramens à Tsujita LA Artisan Noodle.

Postcard from Los Angeles: All the Street Art

You don’t need to head to the Getty or the Broad to see some fabulous art in Los Angeles. Just looking around you, you can’t help but notice a ton of great murals adorning the urban landscape throughout the city. Here are a few cool pieces that I stumbled upon during my recent stay in Los Angeles. 

Spotted: Space Invader in Los Angeles

I grew up in the Marais, so I have razor sharp eyes when it comes to spotting a Space invader piece. This particular one can be seen near the Black Cat in Silver Lake. Also in Silverlake, these colourful staircases. 52 staircases lace the hillsides of Silver Lake, dating back to a time when most residents didn’t have cars. Two of them, #StairTempo and the Micheltorena Stairs, received a boost of bright colours by local artist Corrine Carrey.  

Piano Keyboard staircase in Silverlake

Colorful staircase in Silver Lake

Elliott Smith Mural in Silver Lake

This image appeared on the cover of his Elliott Smith’s 2000 album, “Figure 8,” the last album he would release before his apparent suicide in his Echo Park home. Since then, the “Elliott Smith” wall outside of Solutions electronics on Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake . 

It’s hard to miss the Guelaguetza restaurante in K-Town. I mean, check out these bright orange walls and the awesome murals that also adorn it.

Mural on the facade of facade of La Guelaguetza restaurant in KTown

Lapiztola mural on the facade of facade of La Guelaguetza in KtownLa Guelaguetza restaurant in KTown

orange 3

orange 5

The restaurant itself has been around for over 20 years and in March 2013, its owners invited Colectivo LaPiztola, a pair of Oaxacan artists, to paint a mural, which features a young girl and boy in traditional Oaxacan clothes, and depicts a guelaguetza – the girl is offering corn to the boy, who is holding a chicken. Colette Miller later added some of her famous Global Wings Project wings, and I was very sad that I didn’t have anyone to take my picture with them when I was there 😦

There’s quite a few Shepard Fairey murals in Los Angeles, but one of the most striking is Peace Tree, this 10-story mural gracing the facade of the Line Hotel, also in Los Angeles’s Koreatown.

Peace Tree mural at the Line Hotel by Shepard Fairey

The Line Hotel is a vibrant new(ish) hotel on the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Normandie Avenue, in the heart of Koreatown. In addition to the Shepard Fairey mural, it has some pretty cool art inside as well as a hidden D*Face mural called “Look Into My Eyes” on the exterior.  I *loved* spotting that one! 

D*Face Mural at the Line Hotel in Los Angeles

Sticking with pretty famous street artist, I had read about an Einstein mural by Kobra, on the wall outside Mr. Brainwash’s studio. When I got there, I found a Muhammad Ali tribute mural by Mr. Brainwash there instead, which was cool too… 

Mohamed Ali Mural outside of Mr Brainwash's studio

For a sight of a Kobra mural, I headed to 1220 N. Highland Avenue instead, where the Brazilian artist covered an entire side of the LGBT Youth Center and Annex with a 4,300 square-foot mural featuring the eyes of different Nobel Laureates and champions of peace.

Eduardo Kobramural on the Los Angeles LGBT Center

And for the last two pieces of Los Angeles street art that caught my eyes: the Love L.A. Skyline mural, located right across from the entrance of the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.
Loca L.A. Wall

And the largest stretch of the original Berlin Wall in the world outside of Berlin.
Wende’s Wall Project which commemorated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall Ten segments from the Berlin Wall are currently displayed at 5900 Wilshire Boulevard as part of the Wende’s Wall Project which commemorated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 2009. As part of the project, the Wende Museum commissioned four artists to paint on five of these wall segments, including French-born, Berlin-based artist Thierry Noir (I mentioned him already in my post on the 25th anniversary of the reunification party at the German Embassy), L.A.-based muralist and street artists Kent Twitchell,  Farrah Karapetian and Marie Astrid González. 

There you have it! Please note that this is in no way an exclusive list. I was only in Los Angeles for 4 quick days and there’s a LOT of street art pieces I didn’t even get to. I’m also in no way suggesting that you skip the Getty or the Broad. As a matter of fact, I even have some tips for you if you want to visit The Broad, which you totally should! 

So You Wanna Visit the Broad Museum?

Today, I dedicated 3 hours of my life to visiting Los Angeles’ latest contemporary art space, The Broad (note: it’s pronounced brode not brawd… ) Opened in September 2015, the brand new museum has already become one of the city’s most instagrammed venue, thanks to some amazing (and very photogenic) art from the private collection of philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad, as well as a stunning building designed by world-renowned architectural firm Diller Scofido + Renfro. When I said I dedicated 3 hours to the museum, I should specify that only one of those was spent inside. The other two I spent lining up outside in the standby line. I learned a few things visiting The Broad, so here are a few tips for you:

BOOK ADVANCE TICKETS IF YOU CAN

Entry into The Broad is free BUT you need advance tickets. The website doesn’t really tell you when those will be available, so your best bet if you’re looking to go on a specific date is to sign up for their newsletter to be notified when spots will be released. Right now, you can also purchase tickets to the special exhibit Cindy Sherman: Imitation of Life. They’ll set you back $12 but also include general admission to the museum.  

Cindy Sherman exhibit at The Broad in Los Angeles

If that’s not an option, you can do as I did and wait in the standby line. The museum opens at 11AM on weekdays, and 10AM on weekends. You can follow The Broad Standby Line on twitter to get updates on what the wait time will be like. On a weekday in June, I got in line 2 hours ahead of opening time and was the third person there. Within 20 minutes, the line wrapped around the building, so get there early, especially on Saturdays and Sundays when it’s more crowded. By 11:15AM, just 15 minutes after the museum opened I got to go in. Woohoo! Here’s my tip if you’re going to go the early morning route like I did: grab coffee and food before you get in the line. G & B Coffee at Grand Central Market is just a few steps away (153 steps along the Angel Flights tracks to be exact) and their delightful almond-macadamia milk latte is bound to make waiting a little less painful. 

 

BOOK THE INFINITY MIRROR ROOM IMMEDIATELY UPON GETTING IN

One of the highlights of The Broad, and one of its most instagrammed spot, is Yayoi Kusama‘s “Infinity Mirrored Room – The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away.” The small, shimmering, mirror-lined, experimental space will dazzle you with its seemingly infinite number of LED lights. It’s quite trippy, so it’s probably a good thing you’re only allowed 45 seconds in there – just the right amount of time to snap that perfect #infinityroom selfie!

Infinity Mirrored Room by Yayoi Kusama at the Broad in Los Angeles

To book your spot for this experience, rush to the left of the escalator in the lobby as soon as you get into the museum and enter your name and cell phone number into an iPad that’s provided for that purpose.

How to get into the Infinity Mirrored Room at The Broad

Once that’s done, get back to the lobby, soak up its cavernous look and head up the escalator to the third floor gallery, which houses most of the museum’s collections. You’ll receive a text message in approximately 45 minutes to an hour letting you know when your time in the room is up. Head back downstairs (don’t miss taking a glimpse at the museum’s central vault on the way!) and wait in line (again) until it’s your turn to spend 45 seconds in the infinity mirrored room.

How to get into The Broad's Infinity Mirrored RoomHow to get into The Broad's Infinity Mirrored Room

You can go in on your own, or with a friend/significant other if you prefer but they won’t let more than 2 or 3 people in at the time.

BRING A GOOD CAMERA

Photography is allowed and encouraged at The Broad so bring your good camera and go all out. While not as striking as its Frank Gehry designed neighbour, the museum is still a work of art in its own right. Diller Scofidio + Renfro, best known for the High Line in Manhattan, designed the 120,000-square-foot museum with the Walt Disney Concert Hall in mind and contrasted its smooth silver curves with a solid white block. Its honeycomb facade, known as the veil, softens the structure and makes for stunning pictures if you’re lucky enough to be there on a sunny day (I wasn’t… darn California June fog!)

The Broad Museum in downtown Los Angeles

Inside, there are numerous fun photo opps, like the previously mentioned Infinity Mirrored Room but also a couple of pieces by Jeff Koons (always picture-worthy!), El Anatsui’s 2010 Red Block which makes for a cool backdrop to any selfie or Robert Therrien’s “Under the Table.” Here’s a couple of shots I took in the gallery. 

Keith Haring's Red Room at The BroadTulips by Jeff Koons at The BroadDouble America 2 by Glenn Ligon

One last tip about the art: the museum staff, known as visitor services associates, is numerous (seriously, there’s a small army of them here to help you) and SUPER knowledgeable.  WhileThe Broad has a pretty neat app that you can download ahead of your visit, I found chatting with the VSAs a lot more interesting!

 

SPEND AN HOUR IN THE MUSEUM THEN EXPLORE DOWNTOWN

The Broad is a perfect starting point to visiting downtown Los Angeles, especially if you’ve paid good money to park in a garage. It’s right next to Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall (tip: check out the peekaboo view from the Lichtenstein room on the third floor) and a quick walk to Grand Park (I love that park and its pink chairs!) or Grand Central Market. If you do The Broad in the morning, that’s the perfect spot to grab lunch afterwards!

Peekaboo windows into the Walt Disney Concert Hall from The Broad

Lichtenstein Room at The Broad

Have you visited The Broad yet? If yes, do you have any additional tips you’d like to share?